Nº. 2 of  24

Fuck Yeah Zoology

I share my birthday with Charles Darwin. 180 years after. Eat it.

14-billion-years-later:

I’d love to know more about this picture. Perhaps a chimeric peacock? Random gene inactivation of some kind? DOES ANYONE KNOW?

As would I.

14-billion-years-later:

I’d love to know more about this picture. Perhaps a chimeric peacock? Random gene inactivation of some kind? DOES ANYONE KNOW?

As would I.

slobberknocker:

Dancing alien 
by Velian Jagev 

Recently, I’ve become obsessed with aliens and what they might look like, and how they would behave.
Astrophysics and zoology combine to form… astrozoology!

slobberknocker:

Dancing alien

by Velian Jagev

Recently, I’ve become obsessed with aliens and what they might look like, and how they would behave.

Astrophysics and zoology combine to form… astrozoology!

(via nature123)

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

When the space ship Endeavour launched last week, it was carrying an unusual cargo: a baby bob-tail squid.

This is not because the astronauts want a change in their menu: the squid could help us understand how “good” bacteria behave in the microgravity of space. As Jamie Foster of the University of Florida in Gainesville, who is running the experiment, puts it: “Do good bacteria go bad?”

We already know that disease microbes grow faster and become more virulent if they are sent into space. In 2006 Salmonella bacteria were sent up on a space shuttle, and when they returned to Earth they were almost three times as likely to kill mice as normal (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0707155104). Escherichia coli also changes its behaviour. These studies all focused on harmful bacteria. “This is the first to look at beneficial bacteria,” Foster says.

Foster has arranged to send up the bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes, a Pacific species that carries a cargo of bacteria called Vibrio fischeri in its body. The microbes colonise young squid soon after the squid hatch and set up home in their light organs. The squid use the bacteria to generate light, which they shine downwards to ensure they don’t cast a visible shadow.

Foster’s experiment is simple. Newly hatched squid that have not yet encountered their bacterial partners will go up to orbit in tubes of seawater. Fourteen hours after launch, an astronaut will add the bacteria and give them 28 hours to colonise the squid. Then the squid will be killed and fixed solid, and brought back to Earth for examination.

Foster has some preliminary results from Earth-bound experiments that simulated microgravity and appeared to show problems with the uptake of bacteria by squid. If the shuttle study shows the same result, it would suggest that astronauts’ relationships with their own microbes might also be affected in space. “We want to make sure the astronauts are healthy,” she says.

Foster developed the experiment with Margaret McFall-Ngai of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Florida Space Grant Consortium and students from Milton Academy in Massachusetts and Merritt Island High School, Florida.

"BRB"

(via mad-as-a-marine-biologist)

geologizing:

frilled shark
darylrose:

geologizing:

frilled shark

darylrose:

(via sharktunnel)

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Crinoid Squat Lobster [Allogalathea elegans] from my dive trip to Manado, Indonesia, in 2009.
These are tiny crustaceans that live in Crinoid feather stars. They are the only species in the Genus and are particularly satisfactory to spot.
I was lucky that this little guy was showing off, and I could get a good shot. So many underwater photographers tear apart adjust the marine environment to get the shot. Where’s the fun in that?

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Crinoid Squat Lobster [Allogalathea elegans] from my dive trip to Manado, Indonesia, in 2009.

These are tiny crustaceans that live in Crinoid feather stars. They are the only species in the Genus and are particularly satisfactory to spot.

I was lucky that this little guy was showing off, and I could get a good shot. So many underwater photographers tear apart adjust the marine environment to get the shot. Where’s the fun in that?

(Source: mad-as-a-marine-biologist)

jtotheizzoe:

I have a feeling that a Commodore 64 could out-logic Kirk Cameron when it comes to creationism vs. science. I mean, judging from his extreme knowledge of banana evolution, who could doubt him??
shortformblog:

Kirk Cameron feels disadvantaged against Stephen Hawking
“Like bullying a blind man”: That was what former sitcom actor and adamant Christian activist Kirk Cameron complained it was like to say anything negative about Stephen Hawking. “He has an unfair disadvantage, and that gives him  a free pass on some of his absurd  ideas.” It’s a crass and lowly insult to Hawking to suggest that he’s the benefit of an “unfair disadvantage,” which clearly refers to his ALS. Especially because it implies that he’s the beneficiary of some sort of sympathy within the scientific community, as opposed what his is; the owner of a magnificent mind that’s he’s used to bettering humankind. Whatever you might say about Growing Pains, we reckon that contribution doesn’t measure up. source
Follow ShortFormBlog


BULLY!!!!

jtotheizzoe:

I have a feeling that a Commodore 64 could out-logic Kirk Cameron when it comes to creationism vs. science. I mean, judging from his extreme knowledge of banana evolution, who could doubt him??

shortformblog:

“Like bullying a blind man”: That was what former sitcom actor and adamant Christian activist Kirk Cameron complained it was like to say anything negative about Stephen Hawking. “He has an unfair disadvantage, and that gives him a free pass on some of his absurd ideas.” It’s a crass and lowly insult to Hawking to suggest that he’s the benefit of an “unfair disadvantage,” which clearly refers to his ALS. Especially because it implies that he’s the beneficiary of some sort of sympathy within the scientific community, as opposed what his is; the owner of a magnificent mind that’s he’s used to bettering humankind. Whatever you might say about Growing Pains, we reckon that contribution doesn’t measure up. source

Follow ShortFormBlog

BULLY!!!!

(Source: shortformblog, via jtotheizzoe)

buggirl:

Plume Moths look like fairies.

buggirl:

Plume Moths look like fairies.

poe-souls:

Rufous Hummingbird by *Schpakowski

^_^

poe-souls:

Rufous Hummingbird by *Schpakowski

^_^

(Source: dream-soda, via nature123)

Nº. 2 of  24